Are popcorn, nuts and seeds good or bad for diverticular disease? JAMA looks at diverticulosis.

by James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.

Doctors frequently recommend avoiding popcorn, seeds and nuts if you have diverticulosis (pouches in the lower intestine) because they could clog these pockets and increase your risk of bleeding and inflammation. A new JAMA study refutes this. In fact, it finds that these foods may even prevent those complications. How so?

The study said nuts and popcorn contain fiber, but this fact “did not appear to provide adequate explanation” for the good news. The authors theorize it could be the anti-inflammatory vitamins and cell-healthy minerals in these nutritious foods.

One of our JHMFD experts, Dr. Patricia Raymond, has long-recommended that her patients try these foods on an individual basis. Stop them if they seem to bother you. I would suggest you ask your physician about this study before changing your diet habits.

By the way, strawberries and blueberries were found to have no association at all with diverticular complications.

Has anyone had any digestive problems with nuts, seeds or popcorn? What do you think?

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4 Responses to “Are popcorn, nuts and seeds good or bad for diverticular disease? JAMA looks at diverticulosis.”

  1. Gifts to Pakistan Says:

    hello,

    Nuts and popcorn are commonly uses in different regions of wold. Almost its popular in whole world. But its important to us that how to decrease there usage if they are crating some problems.

  2. Judy Rodman Says:

    Would it be a different story if you have to deal with an ostomy from surgical resection of damaged colon?

  3. James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H. Says:

    Good question Judy. Unfortunately I don’t know. I would check with your gastroenterologist on that.

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