Archive for the ‘Nutrition and Fitness’ Category

Plant Sterols: Lower Your Cholesterol Naturally

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

vegetables-sterols-cholesterolby Leigh Ann Otte

There are lots of ways to lower your cholesterol naturally: exercise, eating less saturated and trans fat, eating more fiber. But have you heard of plant sterols?

Manufacturers have been adding them to foods, and they’re a good option for a bit more help shoving that cholesterol number down, says registered dietitian Carol M. Bareuther. Learn more in this week’s featured article, “Eating Plant Sterols to Lower Cholesterol.”

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance health writer. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

Why Your Legs Are Hurting. (Thanks a Lot, Sunshine.)

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

shinboneby Leigh Ann Otte

Sunny days bring outdoor fun, fitness kicks and weight-loss determination … along with lots of limping.

All this fun in the sun can lead to injuries. Now there’s a pessimistic way to look at exercise. So ignore what I just said—until you start hurting. Then come on back for the lowdown on what’s making your lower legs hurt. In this week’s featured article, orthopedic surgeon William J. Doherty explains three causes of lower-leg pain and how to prevent it.

One tip: Start slowly and build up gradually.

But what fun is that?

 

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance health writer. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

“You’re a What?” When Your Teen Goes Vegetarian

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

by Leigh Ann Otte

Teenagers announce a lot of stuff.

“I’m going out.”

“I want a car.”

“I hate you.”

But one of the most dreaded phrases of all has to be … “I’m a vegetarian now.” *Gasp.* It’s not a big deal if your family is already vegetarian or maybe even if you tend not to eat a lot of meat. But when you’re used to structuring meals around a pot roast, the idea of figuring out meatless suppers can be daunting. Where do you get the protein? This is a growing kid; is giving up meat even healthy?

Our featured article this week is here to help you out. In “Healthy Vegetarian Diet for Teenagers,” get a quick rundown on the nutrients you need to be thinking about, plus some recipe sources to get you started. Even if you don’t have a teenage vegetarian, you might enjoy it. Most of us could use a fruit-and-vegetable boost. Have you heard of the Meatless Monday movement? You go vegetarian for one day. Couldn’t hurt … unless, of course, that day gets filled with donuts.

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance health writer. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

How to Cut Sugar in Secret

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

lollipopsby Leigh Ann Otte

What’s your favorite food group? Mine’s sugar. It’s not a food group? OK then, sweets. Don’t argue.

For this reason, I both love and hate the article we’re featuring this week. Registered dietitian Jill Weisenberger tells us how to stop eating so much of the sweet, powdery delight. I hate it because, well, what’s there to like about eating less sugar? But I love it because it includes easy ways to cut back without your taste buds (or your family) really noticing.

For example, one of her tips is to cut 25 percent in baked goods. Another one is to use the artificial-sweetener baking blends. So I figure, cutting 25 percent and substituting half of the remaining sugar with an artificial sweetener might lead to a deliciously subtle change that no one will mind. Including maybe even me.

What do you think?

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance health writer.

This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

3 Seasoning Tips to Boost Taste and Health

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

by Leigh Ann Otte

Herbs and spices are more than just delicious. They’re also healthy! In this week’s featured article, get lots of great tips on cooking with these little delights. Here’s a taste, so to speak:

  1. Let garlic sit for 10 minutes after chopping it. Heat kills its health-boosting properties; letting it sit before cooking helps preserve them.
  2. To get more flavor out of dried spices, crush them before cooking them.
  3. Make oils more flavorful by infusing them with herbs and spices. Then you can use less of the fat. (Directions are included in the article.)

What’s your favorite healthy seasoning?

Here’s a bonus article: a chart listing which herbs and spices go with what.

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance health writer.

This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

Tips for Yummy, Lower-Salt Food

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

by Leigh Ann Otte

So you want to cut back on salt, but it just tastes so good? Practical registered dietitian Jill Weisenberger has some tips you can live with in this week’s featured article, “7 Tips for Reducing Your Salt Intake.”

For example, if “no added salt” foods taste blander than cardboard to you, try mixing them with the regular versions, to ease your way into this lower-sodium world. And if you’re cooking from a box that comes with a sodium-stuffed seasoning packet, use half the packet.

Get all Weisenberger’s tips in the article, here. And for ideas on healthy dishes to cook at home, check out our recipes section.

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance writer.

This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

Chestnuts Roasting in a Closed Oven …

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

by Leigh Ann Otte

Chestnuts are weird little things. They’ve been called “the grain that grows on trees,” says registered dietitian Tina Ruggiero. They’ve got complex carbohydrates and even vitamin C. Weirder still … we carol about them every year, but have you ever eaten one?

Wanna try? There’s a roasting recipe in this week’s featured article, by Ruggiero. If they don’t turn out, at least you’ll have the oven preheated for s’mores.

Why don’t we have a carol for them?

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com.
This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

A Cranberry Extravaganza (and Why to Smash Them on the Floor)

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

by Leigh Ann Otte

True or false: the best cranberries are bright red.

Answer: false! According to this week’s featured article, by registered dietitian Linda Yerardi:

They come in many shades of red, so color isn’t a reliable indicator of age or freshness.

But the freshest once may bounce. So there’s that.

Learn cranberry health facts, ideas for using them and even a bit of history in our berry special holiday feature. (Can you really blame me?) Plus, here’s a dressing recipe that features the red delights.

Have you made a dish with fresh cranberries this year? How did it turn out?

Merry Christmas, and happy holidays!

Thanksgiving Safety and the Glories of Store-Bought Cookie Dough

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

by Leigh Ann Otte

Can you believe it? Store-bought cookie dough contains pasteurized eggs, so it should be free of salmonella, says registered dietitian D. Milton Stokes in one of this week’s short featured articles. Add that to your “thankful for” list this Thanksgiving.

Speaking of Thanksgiving and food safety … how ’bout them leftovers? How long do you leave them out? All afternoon? All day? Stokes says two hours should be tops. Otherwise, you might have some rather unmerry family members over the weekend. For more food-safety tips, check out our other featured article, “How to Avoid Food Poisoning: 6 Tips.” And then, have a happy Thanksgiving!

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

Thanksgiving Pies: The Healthiest Sugary Picks

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

by Leigh Ann Otte

If you want to pick one of the healthiest pies this Thanksgiving, go for the blueberry, says registered dietitian Carol M. Bareuther. It’s got antioxidants galore.

Another good one? Pumpkin. It boasts fewer calories than many, and one slice has up to half of the daily recommendation for vitamin A.

One of the worst is yummy old chocolate, with high saturated fat and calories. But it’s also high in taste value, I gotta say.

Find all the fun facts in this week’s featured article, “Pie Nutrition: How to Pick a Healthy Slice,” where you’ll also learn how to lighten up your coconut cream pie, and why cherry pie may help your jet lag. (I said might.)

Are you planning on some pie eatin’ this Thanksgiving? What’s your favorite?

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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

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