Posts Tagged ‘healthy recipes’

A Pumpkin Recipe a Day Till Thanksgiving–and Beyond!

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

by Leigh Ann Otte

If you didn’t get your fill of pumpkin last month, now’s your chance.

We’ve found 19 yummy, fun and healthy pumpkin recipes. There are 16 days until Thanksgiving. That means, you can chow down on a different preparation of this sweet, meaty delight through Thanksgiving, Black Friday and even I can’t-eat-one-more-bite-of-turkey day.

The recipes include Pumpkin Spice Granola, Colonial Stewed Pumpkin, Baked Pumpkin Pasta and a couple of somewhat lightened-up pumpkin cheesecake recipes. Yum.

Feel healthy. Live well. Smile. With our free, upbeat health newsletter.

Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance writer specializing in health and aging. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

What NOT to Do When Making Your Own Peanut Butter

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

by Leigh Ann Otte

Have you ever made your own peanut butter? I just did. That’s because we’re featuring a nut-butter recipe this week. And, after slaving over the hot food processor for five minutes (it’s really easy), I’ve come up with some don’ts for you. I’m no gourmet cook, you see. I’m more of a, um, kitchen experimenter.

Keeping that in mind, when making your own peanut butter:

DON’T:

  • Use the last of the peanuts if you’re using the preroasted, salted kind. Or at least make sure you don’t get all that salt from the bottom of the can. Your tongue will shrivel up. (Next time, I’m getting the raw kind and baking them in the oven as directed. I just happened to have some roasted ones on hand, OK? Don’t judge.)
  • Put sugar in it.  Sure, the recipe doesn’t call for it, but I wanted to try it since most people are used to sweetened peanut butter. The sugar cut the rich nutty taste. The result was more bland and not as satisfying or mouth-watering. This coming from a sugar fiend.
  • Expect a completely creamy texture. I think the best way to describe mine is grainy. It’s still delicious, but if you get it creamy, I’d love to hear how.
  • Be afraid of putting olive oil in it. The recipe calls for olive or vegetable oil. I went with extra-virgin olive oil, and it didn’t affect the taste—at least from what I could tell. It only took a couple of teaspoons.

Finally, one do: Expect a savory, scrumptious result. (My results are pictured at the top.) Man, it’s good.

Feel healthy. Live well. Smile. With our free, upbeat health newsletter.

Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a professional writer. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

7 Creative Ideas to Pack in Fruits and Veggies

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

by Leigh Ann Otte

Is half your plate fruits and vegetables?

That’s what the government’s emphasizing now, with the release of the new MyPlate icon. (Bye-bye, food pyramid, old buddy, old pal.) Since many of us tend to bulk up on meat and carbs, that amount of fruits and vegetables may seem dramatic. But actually, packing ‘em in may be easier than you think.

For one thing, you can throw them in with your main dishes. Or pile more on when you’re eating them anyway. Here are five of my favorite simple ideas we’ve featured in various articles:

  1. Toss green beans, eggplant or zucchini into spaghetti sauce or stews.
  2. Add broccoli florets, carrot slices, red pepper strips or chopped cucumber to pasta and potato salads. Do the same with casseroles and lasagnas, while decreasing the amount of cheese.
  3. Keep small plastic bags filled with single servings of cherries or grapes in your refrigerator to make fruit as easy to grab as a bag of chips.
  4. Kids will reach for what they see, so place a bowl of grapes, cherries or clementines on their homework table.
  5. Frozen grapes and bananas make sweet, cool treats in the summer.
  6. Use spaghetti squash instead of pasta.
  7. Rather than serve dessert in little bowls, try hollowing out halved citrus fruit or melon for some added nutrition and color.

The above tips come from these articles:

Want to add a little excitement? How about having a tasting party with exotic fruits and vegetables? In this week’s featured article, we talk about the passion fruit, with its fun edible seeds.

When you add more fruits and vegetables, you might find yourself dropping pounds too. Tasty and rewarding! Pass me a plate. I’m ready to start piling.

Feel healthy. Live well. Smile. With our free, upbeat health newsletter!

Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance health writer. This information is not meant to be individual advice. Please consult your doctor for that. See our disclaimer here.

Creative Summer Recipes: Get Your Fruits and Veggies!

Monday, August 9th, 2010

by Leigh Ann Otte

Doesn’t summer just make your mouth water? Watermelon, plums, cherries, watermelon, tomatoes, corn … watermelon.

If there’s any time of year to start adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet, summer would seem to be a prime one. And one way to add them is by tossing them into whatever you’re already making. This week, we’re featuring an article that gives tips on doing just that: “19 Easy Ideas for Adding Fruits and Vegetables to Your Diet.” The author, registered dietitian Jill Weisenberger, gives creative ideas like, use spaghetti squash instead of pasta, and top grilled chicken or fish with salsa.

Want even more ideas? We have a huge list of healthy summer recipes here, most of which involve lots of fruits and vegetables. There are things like grilled watermelon, pineapple slaw, cantaloupe soup, cucumber yogurt dip and a treat called Frozen Fruit Crunchies.

What’s your favorite fruit or vegetable in the summer?


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Leigh Ann Otte is the managing editor of MyFamilyDoctorMag.com and a freelance writer, editor and blogger.

Weekly Health Tip: Simple lower-calorie dessert (from our current issue)

Monday, August 17th, 2009

IF YOU LIKE …

dessert

… TRY …

angel food cake topped with unsweetened frozen berries and fat-free whipped topping. (Let the berries defrost and get nice and juicy; add some fresh if you like.) One serving is around 200 calories.

Jennifer Neily, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., L.D., health and wellness, exercise and sports nutrition expert in Dallas, Texas

Weekly Health Tip: Healthier topping for baked potatoes (from our current issue)

Monday, August 10th, 2009

IF YOU LIKE …

butter on baked potatoes

… TRY …

olive oil and balsamic vinegar for more flavor and less saturated fat.

—Robyn Priebe, R.D., C.D., Director of Nutrition, Green Mountain at Fox Run women’s health retreat, Ludlow, Vt.

Best Healthy Recipes From Twitter

Thursday, August 6th, 2009

by Leigh Ann Otte, managing editor

Do you like to cook?

Some of our favorite things to post on Twitter are healthy recipes. For this Twitter Friday, we’ve rounded up a few of the best from the last month or so.

We’d love it if you’d share links to your favorite online healthy recipes in the comments section below.

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Weekly Health Tip: How to make your breakfast foods healthier (from our current issue)

Monday, August 3rd, 2009

IF YOU LIKE …

muffins, pancakes or waffles

… TRY …

adding puréed, cooked pumpkin, sweet potato or carrots for beta carotene. Grated carrots or zucchini also works well in pancakes and muffins when trying to eat more vegetables.

—Robyn Priebe, R.D., C.D., Director of Nutrition, Green Mountain at Fox Run women’s health retreat, Ludlow, Vt.

Twitter: Best Healthy Recipes, Registered Dietitians, Nutritionists

Friday, June 19th, 2009

by Leigh Ann Otte, managing editor

Last Friday, we highlighted some great health-related Twitter folks to follow.  Now, it’s time to celebrate registered dietitians and people who tweet healthy recipes.

What do you think of the list?  Any to add?

(more…)

Magazine recipe poisons some for not thinking

Thursday, August 28th, 2008

by James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.

I saw this link on foxnews.com about a cake recipe with a typo that ended up poisoning some people in Sweden who tried it, without thinking, I guess.  The magazine recipe should have said 2 pinches of nutmeg but, instead, called for 20 nutmeg nuts.  When the authors found out about the error they sent out corrections.

“At first we thought this would be enough, because we didn’t really think anyone would bake or eat this cake, since so much nutmeg would give it a horrible, bitter taste, and because it is simply not that easy to get hold of that much nutmeg,” Cocke said.

I am not sure how poisonous that much nutmeg is but even I, who burn canned soup, would know better.  (Come to think of it I have added salt to my coffee, but that’s before I had my caffeine, duh).   From years of experience I have found you should not assume anything when it comes to directions of use, but please, please, think and question before trying something that just does not sound right.  I know it was the magazine’s mistake, but come on.

Do any of you have any similiar (maybe less drastic) tales of woe?

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